Last Updated on 3rd April 2014 Thursday 9:49PM


Attraction around Sandakan :
Agnes Keith House
Batu Tulug
Gomantong Cave
Kinabatangan River
Labuk Bay Proboscis Monkey Sanctuary
Lankayan Island
Libaran Island
Rainforest Discovery Centre (RDC)
Sandakan Crocodile Farm
Sandakan Golf & Country Club
Sandakan Heritage Trail
Sandakan Memorial Park
Sandakan Town
Sepilok Orang Utan Sanctuary
St. Michael's and All Angels Church, Sandakan
Turtle Island Park

 Rainforest Discovery Centre

The Rainforest Discovery Centre (RDC) is located within the Kabili-Sepilok Forest Reserve, and only two km from the Sepilok Orang-utan Rehabilitation Centre.


The Rainforest Discovery Centre (RDC) is an education facility run by the Sabah Forestry Department primarily to create public awareness and appreciation of the importance of conserving forests, as well as the sustainable use of forest resources. Visitors should allow themselves about half a day to fully appreciate what the Centre has to offer.


RM6m upgrade for Rainforest Discovery Centre
Monday November 28, 2011
http://thestar.com.my/news/story.asp...004&sec=nation


KOTA KINABALU:

Sabah's award-winning Rainforest Discovery Centre (RDC) in Sandakan is set to become better next year with additional facilities, including an environmental education activity centre.

The RM6.5mil upgrading of the Sabah Forestry Department-run RDC would also include an 80m extension of its existing 147m-long treetop walkway.

Department director Datuk Sam Manna said an outdoor stage and the facility's car park would be upgraded.

“These new developments will further enhance the standing of the RDC as a top environmental education facility in Sabah,” he said yesterday, adding that work would be completed next November.

Mannan said funding for the work was provided by grants from the federal Tourism Ministry and the Natural Resources and Environment Ministry.

Located some 24km from San-dakan town, the RDC is located adjacent to the internationally renowned Sepilok Orang Utan Rehabilitation Centre.

The RDC, with its 800m trail among dipterocarp trees, is also the venue of Sabah's annual bird-watching festival.

Among the recent additions to the RDC was a new 120-seat theatre early this year.

The RDC was named the state's best tourist attraction in the nature category at last week's Sabah Tourism Awards event.

Opened in 2007, the RDC attracted some 40,000 visitors last year, Mannan said.

He also said the department had commissioned the building of a jungle lodge along the Kawag River in the Ulu Segama Forest Reserve, an area known for its rich wildlife.

He said the contractor had taken possession of the site and was expected to begin work on the lodge before the end of the month.

“We hope the proposed new facility will create more opportunities for forest recreation and tourism in the Lahad Datu area,” he said.


Oriental pied hornbill
Anthracoceros albirostris

 

Image Right : Photography LT Seng

Oriental pied hornbill

RAINFOREST DISCOVERY CENTER

Entrance fees
RM 10.00: Non-Malaysian adults and children above 6 years old.

RM 5.00: Malaysian adults (above 18 years old).

RM 2.00: Malaysian children 5-17 years old.

Left : RDC entrance sticker to be stick on you shirt as identification of entrance fee paid.


PROPOSED CANOPY WALKWAY PHASE 3A AT SEPILOK ARBORETUM RAINFOREST DISCOVERY CENTRE. SANDAKAN, SABAH - TICKET COUNTER AND NEW CANOPY WALKWAY TO LINK UP TO BRISTLE HEAD TOWER NO. 1 (JP/TN/SDC-RDC/01/2009)

Client : JABATAN PERHUTANAN SANDAKAN

Architect  : ARKITEK A. HUSIN

Structure Engineer : MESTAPEX KONSEP SDN. BHD.

Quantity Surveyor : PERUNDING KOS KVC

M&E Engineer : SME KONSULT SDN. BHD.

Main Contractor : BUILDTECH ENTERPRISE

DATE OF COMMENCEMENT : 16 JULY 2009
DATE OF COMPLETION : 15 NOVEMBER 2010

 Rainforest Discovery Centre Rainforest Discovery Centre Rainforest Discovery Centre


The majestic rulers of the Rain Forests!


Many dipterocarps are emergents in the forests, typically reaching heights of 40-70 metres tall with the tallest known living specimen reaching over 85 metres in height (Shorea toguetiana).

The family Dipterocarpaceae consists of 17 genera and approximately 680 species.

1) Genera Shorea (360 species)
2) Genera Hopea (105 species)
3) Genera Dipterocarpus (70 species)
4) Genera Vatica (60 species)

Their distribution is pantropical, from northern South America to Africa, the Seychelles, India, Indochina and Malaysia, with the greatest diversity and abundance in western Malaysia including Borneo.

Parashorea tomentella

Parashorea tomentella
(urat mata beludu)

Diameter at breast height : 78 cm
Clear bole length : 22 m
Merchantable volume : 7.2 m3
Above-ground carbon content: 1.9 tonnes

Shorea smithiana
(seraya timbau)

Diameter at breast height : 82 cm
Clear bole length : 25 m
Merchantable volume : 8.0 m3
Above-ground carbon content: 2.0 tonnes

Parashorea tomentella
(urat mata beludu)
(Dipterocarpaceae)

Genera Parashorea is one of the 17 Genera in the family Dipterocarpaceae that consists 680 species.

 

Shorea smithiana
(seraya timbau)
(Dipterocarpaceae)

Genera Shorea is the largest genera with 360 species.

The family Dipterocarpaceae consists of 17 genera and approximately 680 species.


Dipterocarp Trees

Dipterocarp Trees
found only in Borneo

The family Dipterocarpaceae consists of 17 genera and approximately 680 species. The largest genera are the Shorea (360 species), Hopea (105 species), Dipterocarpus (70 species), and Vatica (60 species). Their distribution is pantropical, from northern South America to Africa, the Seychelles, India, Indochina and Malaysia, with the greatest diversity and abundance in western Malaysia including Borneo

The majestic rulers of the forests!
Many dipterocarps are emergents in the forests, typically reaching heights of 40-70 metres tall with the tallest known living specimen reaching over 85 metres in height (Shorea toguetiana)

Of the approximately 267 dipterocarp species found in Borneo, 160 are endemic to Sabah and Sarawak, meaning that they are found naturally only in 40 the island of Borneo.

Five dipterocarp species are endemic to Sabah i.e. Dipterocarpus ochraceus (keruing Ranau), H o p e a ovo I d e a (selangan), Shorea k u d ate n SI S (seraya kuning Kudat,), Sh.orea micans (selangan batu) and Shorea symingtonii (melapi kuning). The two large ci!pterocarp trees that stand before you are both Bomean endemics. They are common in the Sepilok forest and reach diameters of over 120 cm in old growth forests.  


Belian Tree

Belian Tree
Eusideroxylon zwageri (Lauraceae)

Belian, the Borneo Ironwood!
This tree, photo left.  may be more than 1,000 years old!
Using the carbon dating method, scientists have discovered that large belian trees (like this one) have a mean radial growth rate of 0.058 cm per year. However, early growth may be between 0.8 to 2.0 cm per year in open areas.
With a diameter of about 120 cm, tree may be about 1,020 years old!
Belian can be found in the lowland rainforests of Borneo, Sumatra, Java and the Philippines. Scientically, it is known as Eusideroxylon Zwageri and it is from the plant family Lauraceae. Its other names include tambulian (Philippines) and ulin (Indonesia)...(8) 

Belian timber is the 7th hardest wood in the world!
Besides being extremely hard, belian is also known for its strength and durability. Furthermore, it is very resistant to rot and insect attacks.
Belian is used in heavy construction, marine work, boatbuilding, piling, printing, blocks, specialty furniture, industrial flooring, roofing shingles, tool handles, etc.
Almost all of the wooden structures in the RDC are made using belian timber...(9)
 

Belian wood also used in houseroofing.


Belian trees

Danger of going extinct - Belian trees

Sadly, it is in danger of going extinct. Belian trees were once widespread throughout the east coast of Sabah. However, over- exploitation together with forest clearance have led to the decline of this extremely slow- growing timber species. It is rarely planted in tree plantations mainly due to the lack of seeds and seedlings from the wild. To prevent further loss, Indonesia and Malaysia have put restrictions on the harvesting and export of belian.


 

 

 

 

A personal experience in the rainforest of Borneo.

  Lingering beside a small stream in the Malaysian rainforest of Sabah, on the island of Borneo, I watch the water move swiftly over worn, round stones. The pace of the flow quickens as the stream cascades over a short waterfall into a clear pool. Vibrantly colored butterflies in shades of yellow, orange, and green flirt with columns of light that penetrate the dense canopy. The raucous calls of hornbills challenge the melodic drone of cicadas. Though the forest is never silent or still, it brings a deep sense of calm.

I sit with my feet in the cool water, picking over my clothes in search of leaf leeches, who seek a feeding opportunity in every crease of material. As I remove these brightly hued creatures, I am content to watch a lone male orangutan silently make his way through the branches above the stream. The idyllic setting and the company of my red-bearded simian companion provide the perfect end to my half-day trek.

Such wildlands provide me with an escape from the daily rigors and chaos of my profession, and I have come to greatly appreciate places of natural wonder.
 

I have long been fascinated with the natural world and its creatures but the idea for this project arose from a personal experience in the rainforest of Borneo.......

Rhett Butler
http://rainforests.mongabay.com/preface.htm

 

 

INDEX : Kota Kinabalu  April 03, 2014 09:53:28 PM

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