Yunnan Culture Center
THAILAND
Monsopiad Cultural Village
MALAYSIA
Sarawak Cultural Village
MALAYSIA

SARAWAK CULTURAL VILLAGE

(Kampung Budaya Sarawak)
SARAWAK CULTURAL VILLAGE
A project of Sara Resort Sdn. Bhd.
Pantai Damai, Santubong,

P. 0. Box 2632, 93752 Kuching, Sarawak, Malaysia.
Tel: 082-846411 Fax: 082-846988
URL: www.scv.com.my  E-mail: info@scv.com.my

SARAWAK CULTURAL VILLAGE



PUBLIC SHUTTLE SERVICE

KUCHING CITY to DAMAI BEACH and SARAWAK CULTURAL VILLAGE (SCV)

Charges : Adult Rm 10.00 each way    Child Rm 5.00 each way (6-12 years old)

 

Kuching to
Damai & SCV

Damai & SCV to
Kuching

Depart From Depart From Depart From
  HOLIDAY INN, Kuching CROWNE PLAZA, Kuching SCV & HOLIDAY INN RESORT
1 7:30 am 7:35 am 9:10 am
2 9:00 am 9:05 am 11:15 am
3 10:15 am 10:20 am 1:15 pm
4 12:15 pm 12:20 pm 3:15 pm
5 2:15 pm 2:20 pm 5:15 pm
6 4:15 pm 4:20 pm 7:00 pm
7 6:15 pm 6:20 pm 9:00 pm
8 8:15 pm 8:20 pm  
9 10:00 pm 10:05 pm  
  * above table Yellow highlight suggested departure time for visiting Sarawak Cultural Village

CULTURAL SHOW TIME : 1st Show 11:30 am       2nd Show 4:00 am


The Living Museum

Sarawak Cultural Village portrays "live" the state's rich cultural diversity in one single place. It is a l^/^-acre sprawling expanse on the foothill of the legendary Mount Santubong fronting the South China Sea with 7 authentic ethnic houses built around a man-made lake.

The lake represents the propensity of Sarawakians to site their dwelling alongside rivers or along the coastal areas.

This water-lifeline is replicated as a focal point for water-based activities. There are handicraft-making demonstrations by skilled craft people.

Traditional games, household chores, rituals and ceremonies are performed within and outside the ethnic houses.

The young and exuberant Village artistes provide magnificent multi-cultural dance performances in the modern theatre.

The restaurant serves selected traditional Sarawakian food and the handicraft shop offers fine Sarawak handicrafts and souvenirs.
Bidayuh

The Bidayuh, accounting for 8.4% of Sarawak's population live mainly within the catchments of the Sarawak and Sadong rivers. Early European travelers gave them the name "Land Dayaks" because they live in the steep limestone mountains, near the watershed between West Sarawak in what was then Dutch Borneo.

Many Borneo natives live in longhouses, in effect a row of dwellings and a village street under one roof. The Bidayuh, a group comprising the Jagoi, Biatah, Bukar-Sadong, Selakau and Lara peoples of West Sarawak, built their houses in mountain fastnesses, tacked to a steep hillside like a gigantic staircase. This was partly for protection against enemies, partly for access to pure, fresh water.

The terrain occupied by the Bidayuh inspired them to construct ingenious systems of gravity-fed water supply. A little river is dammed at a distance above the longhouse, and the water carried to the dwelling in bamboo conduits.

Iban

The Iban, once known as "sea Dayaks", built their longhouses to last fifteen to twenty years, or until the farm land in the surrounding area was exhausted. Then they packed up their goods and chattels and moved inland, upriver, along the coast, wherever fresh farm lands looked promising. About one-third of all Sarawakians are Iban; while some of them live in towns or individual houses, a large number still prefer longhouses.

A traditional longhouse is built of axe-hewn timber, tied with creeper fiber, roofed with leaf thatch. It is nearly always built by the bank of a navigable river, and the visitor approaches it from the boat jetty. He climbs up a notched log that serves as a staircase and finds himself on the open verandah, scene of community and domestic activity. Several doorways lead from the outer to the inner verandah, under the roof. This is the village street of the longhouse; the individual family rooms or "doors" front the common walkway. A casual visitor is invited to sit down on a mat here for a chat with the longhouse elder; family members enter their relatives doors and make themselves at home.
Penan

The shy nomadic people of the jungle, the Penans, live in the dense virgin jungles of Central Borneo, among some of the State's most valuable timber resources. Some are "coming out" and learning to farm the land, others still prefer their roaming life-style.

Penan shelters are quickly constructed to last for a few weeks or months. They are sited near a good stand of wild sago trees, the Penan's staple food; after this has been used up, the family moves on.

Another Penan specialty is the manufacture and accurate use of blowpipes. A wood beam of adequate length is fixed in a drilling platform, and then bored by patient manual labor. The pipe is trimmed by axe and knife, and finally polished; the bore is smoothed and ground by pulling lengths of rattan through it. Blowpipe ammunition is a softwood plug tipped with a hardwood dart. Blowpipe poison, carefully dosed to suit the prey, is made from the sap of the Atap tree (Antiaris toxicaria).
Orang Ulu

Orang Ulu, "up-river dwellers", is a useful if vague term to describe the Central Borneo people living is Sarawak. Accounting for 5.5% of the total population, the Orang Ulu comprise the Penan, the Kayan and Kenyah, living in the middle and upper reaches of Sarawak's longest rivers, the Kelabit and Lun Bawang groups in the highlands proper.

In the past, the Orang Ulu were famous throughout the region as sword-smiths. They extracted iron from the ore found in their area, they forged it into excellent blades which they tempered in the cold mountain streams.

Traditionally, an Orang Ulu longhouse was built to last. Many of these people practice settled agriculture, and have developed rice field irrigation to a fine art. This makes the search for new farmlands unnecessary. The solid ironwood houses are designed for many generations.
Melanau

The Melanau people 5.8% of Sarawak's population now mostly living in the central coastal region, were once more widely scattered. They traditionally lived near the sea within reach of the pirates. The Melanau built massive houses forty feet above the ground.

The Melanau differ from most other Borneo people in one important respect- they eat sago in preference to rice. Sago palms originally grew wild in the coastal swamps, and they are cultivated. The ten-meter high palm trunk accumulates starch. It swells just before flowering and that is the right time to harvest it by felling.

The pith is grated to a fine mash This is soaked in a long wooden trough, then trodden through a mat to leach out the sago starch. The off-white sediment settles in the bottom of the trough it is spread on mats to dry into lumps. These are broken up and finally ground into flour.
Malays

The house of an urban Malay family is a gracious structure well adapted to the climate. Like all local houses, it was built of wood. The Brooke era brought lofty ideas on columns, stucco, and indoor plumbing. Since the 1860s a few leading Malays families commissioned professional builders, often Chinese, to construct their stately homes; a few which may still be seen in Datus Road in Kuching.

From the humblest to the highest, Malay houses share certain characteristics. They are built on stilts; a visitor approaching from the front comes up a staircase. He announces his presence before he reaches the verandah. This may be quite small, or lead along the front of the house; it permits a stranger to wait until somebody welcomes him in.

The area designated for the men, official occasions and the entertainment of guests, is a front room that takes up the width of the house. Windows cut down to floor level admit the breeze to circulate among the seated people. Much artistic skill is lavished on the decoration of the stair and window railings, fascia boards under the eaves, ventilation grills above or beside doorways.
 

Dance Synopsis

The people of Sarawak are cheerful and friendly in disposition. They are a very happy people and they translate a lot of their daily chores and activities into graceful and interesting dances.

All their dances tell stories of happenings amongst and around them in their daily living.

Iban - Ngajat Lesong

In this dance, the Iban warrior demonstrates the extraordinary strength of his teeth by lifting the mortar, weighing around 20 kg. Dancing with the mortar hanging from his mouth shows the agility of the warrior and is a feat of endurance.

Iban - Ngajat Pahlawan

This is a traditional welcoming dance performed by the villagers to welcome their warriors after they have come back from a victorious battle.

Bidayuh - Rajang Be'uh

This dance is usually performed after the harvest season as a form of entertainment for guests of the longhouse. The movements of the dancers with outstretched hands imitate the movements of the eagles as they flap their wings in flight.
Bidayuh - Tolak Bala

Before the harvesting season, the community performed this dance to ask for blessing for a good harvest and to protect the community from evil spirits.

Bidayuh - Langgi Julang

This is a ritual dance performed by the villagers in occasion to elect a new chief for the village. The dance is performed by dancing on the julang or brass tray by the Bidayuh men. They are accompanied by the beautiful Bidayuh maidens.

Orang Ulu - Datun Julud

This is a traditional welcoming dance. performed by the beautiful Orang Ulu maidens to welcome guests of the longhouse.

Orang Ulu - Kanjet Ngeleput

This dance portrays the nimble but stealthy steps of the warrior as he goes about on a hunting trip in the jungle, searching for his prey. He sees his target, takes aim and blows out a deadly dart which seldom fails to find its mark.

Melanau - Tarian Menyak

This dance portrays the harmonious atmosphere, showing as how the Melanau carry out their daily activities of processing sago flour for the making of sago pearls, locally known as "Sago".
Melanau - Alu-Alu

This dance is usually performed during a death ceremony to comfort the visiting relatives and friends.

Malay - Senandong Sarawak

Senandong Sarawak is a dance which incorporates two popular Malay dances of Sarawak. The traditional Dayang Sari which reflects the identity of a Sarawak Malay Woman and is followed by the traditional and ever popular Malay Joget.

Malay - Tarian Royong

This dance is a modern creation which employs the traditional and ever popular joget. The dance depicts the Malay youths playfulness as they relax after a hard day's work.

Malay - Serampang Baru

This dance portrays the joyous atmosphere in the Malay Village in a mood of celebration. This is the time when the young Malay youths come out to court their ladies in their fineries.

Chinese - The Lion Dance

The Chinese has always considered the Lion as the protector of law and order which carries the significance of peace and prosperity and a symbol of strength, courage and power. Today, it has became the most popular item in the celebration of Chinese New Year.
 

 



FASCINATING SARAWAK

HERE WE ARE LIVING AS ONE
BENEATH OUR CRESCENT, STRIPES AND STAR
PEOPLE EVERY WHERE THROUGH OUT THE LAND
LOVE SARAWAK AND TOGETHER, TOGETHER
LET'S MAKE OUR LAND OF BEAUTY
THE BEST....................................

COME AND ENJOY, COME LETS ALL LEARN
TO APPRECIATE THE RICHNESS OF OUR CULTURES
TO EXPERIENCE OUR FRIENDSHIP AND OUR GRACE
HERE WE ARE LIVING AS ONE
BENEATH OUR CRESCENT, STRIPES AND STAR
PEOPLE EVERY WHERE THROUGH OUT THE LAND
LOVE SARAWAK AND TOGETHER, TOGETHER
LET'S MAKE OUR LAND OF BEAUTY
THE BEST....................................

PEACE AND HARMONY, LOVE AND UNITY
LET'S SHARE OUR WORLD WITH ONE ANOTHER
WE ARE PROUD OF THIS GREAT PLACE SARAWAK
HERE WE ARE LIVING AS ONE
BENEATH OUR CRESCENT, STRIPES AND STAR
PEOPLE EVERY WHERE THROUGH OUT THE LAND
LOVE SARAWAK AND TOGETHER, TOGETHER
LETS MAKE OUR LAND OF BEAUTY
THE BEST....................................

COMPOSED BY: GERARD LAW


HOW TO GET THERE

40 minutes drive from Kuching.
5 minutes walk from Holiday Inn Resort Damai Beach.
5 minutes walk from Holiday Inn Damai Lagoon Resort.
6 minutes from Damai Golf Course.

A wide range of transport ia available from Kuching:

City / Damai Shuttle, Taxi, Local Tour Agents


General Admission

RM 45.00 (adult) RM 22.50 (child 6-12 yrs.)

We invite guests to arrive at the village at the start of each activity programme.

Opening hours : 09.00 hrs -16.45 hrs
Cultural shows : 11.30 hrs-12.15 hrs / 16.00 hrs- 16.45 hrs

 

Sarawak  Cultural  Village   <Chinese Version>
 

Sarawak Cultural Village: "See Sarawak in Half a Day" is the claim made by Sarawak Cultural Village, a unique award-winning living museum offering an excellent introduction to local cultures and lifestyles. On a sprawling 17-acre site just a short walk from the nearby resort hotels, there are replica buildings representing every major ethnic group in Sarawak; Bidayuh, Iban and Orang Ulu longhouses, a Penan jungle settlement, a Melanau tall-house, a Malay town house with adjacent top-spinning court, a Chinese farm House and a Chinese pagoda. All the buildings are staffed with members of the various ethnic groups, in traditional costume, carrying out traditional activities. Each building has a "storyteller" who is expert in describing and interpreting traditional cultures and lifestyles.

After touring the village, you can enjoy a multi-cultural dance performance in the village's own theatre. There is also a good restaurant and a handicrafts shop on-site. Sarawak Cultural Village can also host theme dinners and parties (check with your hotel), and you can even get married here, in traditional Iban, Bidayuh, Malay or Orang Ulu style! Admission is RM 45 (Children age 6-12, RM 22.50, below 6 free.), or you can take a half-day tour from Kuching, including lunch and transport to and from your hotel, for RM 60 (Children RM 40). Open 9 am - 5 pm daily. Dance performances at 11.30 am and 4.00 pm. Tel: 846411, Fax: 846988, E-mail info@scv.com.my for tour bookings and enquiries, www.scv.com.my

Sarawak  Cultural  Village

Known as The Living Museum, it is situated about 32 kms from Kuching City. Located at the foot of the legendary Mt Santubong, it covers an area of 14 hectares of tropical rainforest. Since its opening in 1991, it is one of Malaysia's best-known and best-loved visitor attractions and an important showcase for Sarawak's cultures and traditions. Whilst here, you will be able to view replica of traditional dwelling houses of 07 ethnic groups in Sarawak, namely the Bidayuh, Iban, Penan, Orang Ulu, Melanau, Malay and the Chinese. Sample the warm hospitality of those who resides at the village and discovers the traditional and cultural diversities of the people of Sarawak in just one visit. After your guided tour, enjoy yourself as you will be entertained by the Village's own internationally famous dance troupe, with their most spectacular cultural dance performance at their in-house theatre.





Sematan Palm Beach Resort   | Bau  |  Lundu  |  Santubong  |  SARAWAK   RIVER  |

Official website of

Sarawak  Cultural  Village

 http://www.scv.com.my/


 September 24, 2017 11:18:58 PM

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